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does law enforcement approach this scenario? what do you think the next few hours will look like? >> i think it will be a deliberative and careful process. as you say, they are closing in on the suspect and that is tightening. one of the concerns is does this individual have explosives attached to his body, has he taken someone hostage. is that wired explosively and we've seen that in other plots as the net tightened that the individuals decided to use explosives. >> we have boston p.d. on this, there's fbi, there's atf and massachusetts guardsmen. who is in the lead here? >> the lead will be the joint terrorism task force which is led by the fbi. so in a sense, they're organizing all of the constituent agencies and giving direction. i wonder, someone mentioned the events in the last three hour, this all was an attempted robbery. an m.i.t. rob shot and killed, grenades thrown from a vehicle. report of the dead suspect having an ied on his person. characterize, scale from one to ten, level of danger as they get closer to this remaining suspect? >> i would say it's about a level eight. b
>> is this evident? >>> well more than the evidence is law enforcement and others have said at the federal state and local level and indeed from the region, we have an unprecedented level of law enforcement support and they are working very well. >> what is the process so far that helps you understand maybe for the materials and the level of complementty of the device -- complexity and the origin of the devise? >> i think i know what you are getting at. i can't comment on that aspect of that. what is important to say, what i would like to on behalf of the boston j.t. tf today, they say there is no known threat where we are conducting investigative activity and i want to put that out to the citizens and the city of boston and the commonwealth of massachusetts. >> do you know anything about the nature of device -- [inaudible] >> i am not going to be able to comment on the nature of the device right now. >> are they in custody right now? >> i'm not going to say who or who might not be in custody right now. >> is there one person from ocean avenue that are -- and [inaudible]. >>
the decision and, of course, i'm not second-guessing anybody. i did talk to a law enforcement officer over the weekend who, first of all, said, you know, it would have been much better for us all if this had been plotted out of a cave in afghanistan instead of, you know, an apartment in cambridge. >> one among us. >> yeah, one among us. but also he was saying not so sure about them shutting down the entire city and the message that that sends. you talk about copycats. the copycat said if i do something particularly heinous, i can hold an entire city hostage. >> one of the purposes of terrorists is to disrupt and forcing a city shut down and the rest, she used that end in addition to killing and injurying that you do. one of the reasons -- i don't want to second-guess the tactical decision to lock down boston. but i don't think this is something that if you will a scaleable or sustainable. >> no, we can't do this. >> imagine these guys hadn't been captured and all that. >> after what happened to the boston marathon in an internationally visible way. we were covering this all morning long. i
of the establishment. look at aljer hiss. he was a supreme court court. his brother was a law partner. how could he be a communist spy? yet, he was. terrorists can learn that lesson. the best way to avoid scrutiny is to look like you fit in. >> we just had anna chatman, remember her, the sexy russian spy who is moscow and putin gave her an award. you raise a point about letting him back into the country, not just the first time but last year when he came back from russia. has there been an unfortunate pattern of that? egypt didn't want theli sheikh. he's convicted of being the leader of the cell that went to attack the world trade center in 1993 and plot the bombing of landmarks. he's a notorious convicted international terrorist. where is the gap? where are the holes? have we made mistakes? >> i think there are a lot of holes in our immigration system. look. i speak as someone who favors more legal immigration, but i can tell you. when i was at the justice department in the 1980s, fbi agents came and told me there were 10,000 iranian graduate students in the country and they weren't studying engli
with international law. so are these drone strikes illegal? do you believe? >> these drone strikes the way they're being carried out is illegal. >> bill: that's a pretty bold statement. the united states is breaking the law. >> well, the only time the united states, outside a battlefield area the only time the united states or any country can use lethal force against someone is in self-defense. and what we know from a leaked document, a leaked legal document that is called the white paper. they have this view of what self-defense means. a view of self-defense is not -- would not be recognized by any court in the united states and no court in the world. it basically says that the test for self-defense is you have to be stopping an imminent threat. but here they're saying imminent does not mean it is about to happen. imminent just means there's some kind of pattern of behavior. >> bill: some day you think it might happen. >> yeah. >> bill: i think it is extremely important issue. i'm glad you're out in front. i think we've got to keep the pressure on and not only be careful about those drones ove
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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